This Week in Cyber: March 7th – March 11th

Digital Security by Design

This week saw the final two events in our series of roadshows. On March 8th in Newport, Wales, attendees learned about the research and development project, Morello, and on the technology application of DSbD and the value it can bring to different industry sectors. They also heard about the importance of partnerships and how to get involved in the DSbD Technology Access Programme and how their organisation can access this early-stage prototype technology. There were some phenomenal speakers as part of the line-up:

  • Clare Johnson, Partnerships and Outreach Manager (Digital and STEM), Founder and Director of Women in Cyber Wales, talked about the importance of partnerships and collaborations in the adoption of new technologies).
  • Professor John Goodacre, SbD Challenge Director, UKRI, shared an overview of the Digital Security by Design Challenge.
  • Richard Grisenthwaite, SVP Chief Architect and Fellow at Arm detailed the Arm Morello project.
  • David Chisnall from Microsoft posed the question – do we still need safe languages if we have CHERI?
  • Katy Ho, Head of Innovation at Digital Catapult ended the event by explaining how attendees can get involved in the DSbD Technology Access Programme.

If you missed the event, and would like to view it on demand, you can access it here. 

Yesterday, in Belfast, attendees heard about how a safe and secure cyberspace is fundamental to making the UK the safest place in the world to live, work and play. This set of talks highlighted what the future holds if we really trust computers. Yet again, visitors to the event were treated to a stellar line up of experts:

  • Professor Adam Joinson, Director of DiscribeHub+, and professor at the University of Bath, discussed the social-economic impact of security on trust.
  • Philip Wilson, Director of Research & Development at The Hut Group Plc, presented a case study of security in ecommerce.
  • Tim Silversides, CEO at Pytilia, talked about growing business and differentiating through security by design.
  • Professor Maire O’Neil, School of Electronics, Electrical Engineering Computer Science, Queens University detailed the future for trusted computers.

If you missed the event, and would like to view it on demand, you can access it here.

In addition, James Coker at Infosecurity Magazine has written a feature on both events, which you can read here – Newport and Belfast.

In addition, this week, John Goodacre had some interesting points to make about password managers. Commenting on this, he said “Needing to remember lots of passwords is hard and leaves us humans all too often using the same password many times.  This can mean that, if there is a single vulnerability in just one of the apps or sites you access, you are giving hackers access to your entire digital life. Password managers can generate more secure passwords and automatically log you in, however the main downside is it means any vulnerability in your password manager can still end up giving hackers access to your entire digital life.

“It’s more likely that a security product such as a password manager has considered its own cybersecurity more closely than some website you left a copy of your password with. However, to take control over your accounts, wherever possible, users should also use two-factor authentication along with a reputable password manager.

“Modern browsers include password managers for your web accounts, with most phones also providing integrated password managers that work with both web and apps. Whether you choose to use a separate password manager will depend on whether you want your passwords to be managed independently of which brand of browser or phone you want to use.”

 


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You can find out more about the Industrial Strategy Challenge Fund here

Delivered by Digital Catapult, funded by UKRI through the Digital Security by Design programme.